Talus Osteochondral Bruises and Stress Injury

about monitoring stress injury of the talar dome with dynamic MRI and CBCT exam

Today I present you the clinical picture of a medial talar bone edema and spongious impaction of an elite runner; I’d like to remind you that a bone bruise is a subchondral osseous fracture of the cancellous microarchitecture with accompanied local hemorrhage and edema, so less indication for ultrasound imaging in this case. Yes, with ultrasound we can perfectly see the cortical irregularity but nothing about the definitive staging of the disease, so don’t forget: MRI is the method of choice (Stress Fracture in Runners).

Talus Injury MRI

Three months after the study was completed with Cone-Beam Ct scan; try to identify risk factors and training errors predisposing to stress fractures is mandatory.

Talus Injury Monitoring

Talar Injury CT

I always use the dynamic MRI-CBCT examination before the return to activity.

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Tibial Tunnel Cyst

About diagnostic imaging of postoperative complication of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

This is the case of a patient the came to my observation for a palpable mass into the anterior-medial pretibial region, two years after ACL reconstruction.

Tunnel cyst formation is a rare complication after ACL reconstruction, usually occurring 1-5 years post-operatively, which may occasionally be symptomatic. The ultrasound exam in this case is not enough. The study is completed with MRI and Cone-Beam CT examination.

Tibial Tunnel Cyst MRI

MRI-Cone-Beam CT

Why Cone-Beam CT? Same diagnostic capability of total-body CT but low radiation dose!

Low Radiation Dose

The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is a commonly used radiation exposure index in X-ray computed tomography (CT); in this case 4,74 mGy was the value detected. 16.98 mGy is the estimated absorbed dose by using a total-body CT scan for the same examination.

Total-Body CT