Talus Osteochondral Bruises and Stress Injury

about monitoring stress injury of the talar dome with dynamic MRI and CBCT exam

Today I present you the clinical picture of a medial talar bone edema and spongious impaction of an elite runner; I’d like to remind you that a bone bruise is a subchondral osseous fracture of the cancellous microarchitecture with accompanied local hemorrhage and edema, so less indication for ultrasound imaging in this case. Yes, with ultrasound we can perfectly see the cortical irregularity but nothing about the definitive staging of the disease, so don’t forget: MRI is the method of choice (Stress Fracture in Runners).

Talus Injury MRI

Three months after the study was completed with Cone-Beam Ct scan; try to identify risk factors and training errors predisposing to stress fractures is mandatory.

Talus Injury Monitoring

Talar Injury CT

I always use the dynamic MRI-CBCT examination before the return to activity.

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Tibial Tunnel Cyst

About diagnostic imaging of postoperative complication of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

This is the case of a patient the came to my observation for a palpable mass into the anterior-medial pretibial region, two years after ACL reconstruction.

Tunnel cyst formation is a rare complication after ACL reconstruction, usually occurring 1-5 years post-operatively, which may occasionally be symptomatic. The ultrasound exam in this case is not enough. The study is completed with MRI and Cone-Beam CT examination.

Tibial Tunnel Cyst MRI

MRI-Cone-Beam CT

Why Cone-Beam CT? Same diagnostic capability of total-body CT but low radiation dose!

Low Radiation Dose

The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is a commonly used radiation exposure index in X-ray computed tomography (CT); in this case 4,74 mGy was the value detected. 16.98 mGy is the estimated absorbed dose by using a total-body CT scan for the same examination.

Total-Body CT

Imaging of TFCC Injury of the Wrist

about dynamic cone-beam ct imaging of TFCC wrist injury

It’s always difficult to combine clinical aspects and diagnostic imaging, approaching wrist joint pathology; in many circumstances the orthopaedic surgeon needs to directly visualize what’s happened during the joint motion, especially in a complex region such as the wrist.

I show you an example in which a complex tear of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is evident, togheter with a positive ulnar variance. TFCC is a complex of a fibrocartilaginous disk in association with several ligamentous structures, acting as a  stabilizers of the distal radioulnar joint, and transmitting axial loading from carpus to the ulna.

TFC Injury

Coronal T1w (left) and 3D SHARC (right) Mri scans (0.3 Tesla).

The dedicated Mri examination (0.3 Tesla), depicts the pathologic picture; the ulnar plus defines the reduction of the quadrilateral ulno-carpal space, and the consequent complex tear of the TFCC at its ulnar attachment; but what happens during the active movements? I usually perform also the dynamic evaluation, both with ultrasound and Mri exams. In this case the Cone-beam CT (CBCT) dynamic acquisitions give the answer.

Dynamic MSK Imaging of Metacarpal Fracture

About dynamic msk imaging modalities in the study of post-traumatic metacarpal fracture

4th metacarpal fracture

Acute 4th metacarpal spiroid fracture of a professional football goalkeeper; first diagnosis was made directly on pitch with an ultrasound examination. Plain radiographs and Mri exam were performed just one hour after trauma.

One month after surgical fixation the fracture is studied with dynamic US, Mri and Cone-Beam CT imaging. The US and MR dynamic evaluations, show a regular tendon sliding over the fixation devices.

No metal-induced artifacts were seen, allowing a perfect visualization of the implanted devices.

CBCT Reconstruction

Cone-Beam CT Sagittal (left) and Coronal (right) reconstructions.

The study was completed with dynamic Mri (0.3 Tesla) and Cone-Beam CT scans, performed with active flexion-extension of carpal-metacarpal joint structures.

Ulnar Nerve Synovial Impingement

about dynamic ultrasound findings of ulnar nerve synovial impingement

This is the case of a patient suffering for a post-traumatic olecranon bursitis with ulnar nerve entrapment symptoms, one month after an elbow contusion.

A standard plain radiograph was made immediatly after trauma, showing a small bony fragment of the olecranon cortical surface.

Elbow

Olecranon Bursitis

Sagittal T2w (left) and Axial T2w (right) Mri scans (0.3 Tesla).

The Mri exam shows a gross olecranon bursitis, but the inflammatory process involving the ulnar nerve is better appreciated with the dynamic ultrasound examination.

My suggestion is always tha same… Mri and Ultrasound exams complement each other succesfully, so use both togheter in your daily practice.

Calcaneofibular Ligament Injury

There is usually a predictable kinematic pattern of injury involving the anterior talofibular ligament followed by the calcaneofibular ligament; don’t forget that finding a complete rupture of the calcaneofibular ligament means that also the anterior talofibular ligament must be injured.

pierarrow

Coronal (left) and Axial (right) T2 weighted Mri scans (0.3 Tesla) demonstrate a complete rupture of the calcaneofibular ligament.

The ultrasound imaging needs an accurate dynamic evaluation to demonstrate the injured ligament.

In this young professional football player both the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments are completely torn.

pierarrow2

Coronal (left) and Axial (right) T2 weighted Mri scans of the same patient: a complete rupture of the ATFL is evident.

The ultrasound dynamic investigation well defines the high degree injury of the ligament.

1 Month After…. Anterior Talo-Fibular Ligament (ATFL) Injury

Have you seen my recent post Anterior Talo-Fibular Ligament (ATFL) Injury? In this new post you can see the changes of Mri and Ultrasound imaging after one month; it’s very important the monitoring with both modalities but…. don’t forget to consider also the evolution of clinical presentation and if possible, go on the playing field to directly see the real situation.

Pellebis

Axial T2 weighted an Fast Stir Mri scans (0.3 Tesla) 1 month after a complete rupture of the ATFL