Talus Osteochondral Bruises and Stress Injury

about monitoring stress injury of the talar dome with dynamic MRI and CBCT exam

Today I present you the clinical picture of a medial talar bone edema and spongious impaction of an elite runner; I’d like to remind you that a bone bruise is a subchondral osseous fracture of the cancellous microarchitecture with accompanied local hemorrhage and edema, so less indication for ultrasound imaging in this case. Yes, with ultrasound we can perfectly see the cortical irregularity but nothing about the definitive staging of the disease, so don’t forget: MRI is the method of choice (Stress Fracture in Runners).

Talus Injury MRI

Three months after the study was completed with Cone-Beam Ct scan; try to identify risk factors and training errors predisposing to stress fractures is mandatory.

Talus Injury Monitoring

Talar Injury CT

I always use the dynamic MRI-CBCT examination before the return to activity.

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Bipartite Hallux Sesamoid Injury

about dynamic ultrasound and MRi findings of post-traumatic injury of a medial bipartite hallux sesamoid bone

Today I show you the injury of a medial bipartite hallux sesamoid bone in a professional football player; extremely painful after trauma, it takes time to heal.

Sesamoid

Standard X-Ray exam after trauma.

Medial Bipartite Sesamoid MRI

Sagittal (left) and Coronal (right) Ge-Stir Mri sequences (0.3 Tesla); bone marrow edema of the medial sesamoid is evident.

I always perform also the dynamic evaluation, both with ultrasound and Mri exams.

 

Dynamic MSK Imaging of Metacarpal Fracture

About dynamic msk imaging modalities in the study of post-traumatic metacarpal fracture

4th metacarpal fracture

Acute 4th metacarpal spiroid fracture of a professional football goalkeeper; first diagnosis was made directly on pitch with an ultrasound examination. Plain radiographs and Mri exam were performed just one hour after trauma.

One month after surgical fixation the fracture is studied with dynamic US, Mri and Cone-Beam CT imaging. The US and MR dynamic evaluations, show a regular tendon sliding over the fixation devices.

No metal-induced artifacts were seen, allowing a perfect visualization of the implanted devices.

CBCT Reconstruction

Cone-Beam CT Sagittal (left) and Coronal (right) reconstructions.

The study was completed with dynamic Mri (0.3 Tesla) and Cone-Beam CT scans, performed with active flexion-extension of carpal-metacarpal joint structures.

Patellar Tendon Tear

about dynamic ultrasound and mri evaluation of partial patellar tendon tear

Today I show you the case of a partial tear at proximal insertion of the patellar tendon in a professional football player. The patient refears pain during flexion-extension at inferior patellar pole; hystory of repetitive trauma as usual in football players.

Patellar Tendon Tear

Sagittal Xbone T1w (left) and T1w TSE (right) Mri scan (o.3 Tesla)

The Mri exam shows a partial tear of the patellar tendon proximal insertion. In these kind of injury I always need a dynamic ultrasound exam, both in clino and orthostatic position.

The partial tear is better depicted with the dynamic ultrasound evaluation; the dynamic Mri is also useful to appreciate the tendon relationship with the patella.

Dorsal Scapholunate Ligament Tear

about dynamic mri and ultrasound examination of carpal instability

In my previous post Dynamic Evaluation of Dorsal Scapholunate Ligament I showed the usefulness of both ultrasound and Mri dynamic evaluation in the study of this important ligament structure. Today I want to show you the dorsal scapholunate ligament (SL) tear in a patient that came to my observation after a regular healing of post-traumatic scaphoid fracture.

SL Tear

Coronal Stir (left) and T1w (right)  Mri scans (0.3 Tesla): correct visualization with no artifacts of post-surgical treatment with scaphoid screw. Tear of the dorsal scapholunate ligament is evident (red arrow).

For the appropriate treatment is crucial to see also the dynamic behaviour of this kind of injuries. I always perform both ultrasound and Mri dynamic evaluation in these cases.

The dynamic ultrasound exam shows the post-traumatic carpal instability; dorsal SL tear is evident, togheter with the scapholunate dissociation and DISI picture.

For the correct ultrasound scanning please see my previous post Dynamic Evaluation of Dorsal Scapholunate Ligament.

The Dynamic Mri evaluation (0.3 Tesla) during flexion-extension and ulnar-radial deviation confirms the clinical picture, better defining all the pathologic findings. The radiology technician plays a crucial role for this kind of examination, explaining to the patient the correct wrist movement during the Mri acquisitions.

Haglund’s Syndrome

About dynamic ultrasound and Mri study of Haglund’s syndrome

Pain at the back of the heel is the clinical presentation of Haglund’s syndrome; Achilles tendinophaty, bony enlargement on posterosuperior aspect of calcaneum and retrocalcaneus bursitis are the main characteristics of this painful syndrome, also associated with calcaneal spurs.  Repetitive impingement microtraumas lead to Achilles tendon degeneration.

I always perform both ultrasound and Mri examinations; direct visualization of the impingement syndrome allows to better estimate the tendon damages and all associated painful conditions, such as the retrocalcaneal bursitis.

Don’t forget to take a look at the Kager’s fat pad triangle; on ultrasound exam its echogenicity need to be the same or inferior than Achilles tendon appearance.

In this patient hyperechogenicity of Kager’s triangle is evident, due to its chronic involvement in the inflammatory process.

haglunds-deformity

From left to right: Sagittal T1w – Xbone T1w and Ge Stir Mri sequences of the same patient (0.3 Tesla).

The Mri exam also shows a stress fracture of the posterosuperior corner of the calcaneus.

The site of impingement is better demonstrated also with the Mri dynamic examination.

Patellar Tendon Degeneration part II

about patellar tendon degeneration

In a previous post I showed you my daily routine in studying patellar tendon degeneration and how crucial is to combine all the imaging modalities for a better treatment strategies.

It’s not easy to study post-surgical outcomes of a tendon with the Mri evaluation; lots of artifacts and calcfications doesn’t allow a clear visualization of tendon’s fibres.

patellar-tendon-degeneration

Sagittal T1w (left) and GeStir (right) of patellar tendon degeneration 10 years after surgery reconstruction; red arrows indicate the site of pain.

This is the case of a patient that ten years after surgical reconstruction of the patellar tendon, starts to feel pain. Is it possible to “see” the pain? Gross tendon degeneration is evident but, only with ultrasound examination I can better depict the hypervascularity of the tendon in the site of referred pain and the relationship between patellar tendon and Hoffa’s fat pad, its well known “biomechanical attenuator”.

But I also asked to myself: what’s behind this tendon degeneration? Dynamic Mri study gave me the answer: a scarce patellar mobility during active flexion-extension movements was evident.

Less patellar mobility means more stress for the tendon. Isn’t it?