Hamstring Conjoint ​Tendon Complete Rupture

about ultrasound, mri and thermography findings of hamstring conjoint complete tear

Today I show you the clinical case of a professional long-distance runner that felt a moderate pain at the proximal posterior side of his right thigh, after a city marathon. The patient came for first to perform an ultrasound exam.

When the injury involves only the tendinous component, less hematoma can be found, so pay attention when you perform the ultrasound examination; the elastosonography exam can help you, in this case, working like a “contrast agent” better depicting the site of injury.

I suggest you always to perform both MRI and ultrasound exams to establish the real amount of the injury.

And what’s about the thermography examination? A clear asymmetry of the skin temperature is evident in the site of injury, with the right thigh 3.4 °C colder than the left side.

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Tibial Tunnel Cyst

About diagnostic imaging of postoperative complication of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

This is the case of a patient the came to my observation for a palpable mass into the anterior-medial pretibial region, two years after ACL reconstruction.

Tunnel cyst formation is a rare complication after ACL reconstruction, usually occurring 1-5 years post-operatively, which may occasionally be symptomatic. The ultrasound exam in this case is not enough. The study is completed with MRI and Cone-Beam CT examination.

Tibial Tunnel Cyst MRI

MRI-Cone-Beam CT

Why Cone-Beam CT? Same diagnostic capability of total-body CT but low radiation dose!

Low Radiation Dose

The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is a commonly used radiation exposure index in X-ray computed tomography (CT); in this case 4,74 mGy was the value detected. 16.98 mGy is the estimated absorbed dose by using a total-body CT scan for the same examination.

Total-Body CT